Area Code 560

    area code

  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.
  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada

    560

  • 500 (five hundred) is the natural number following 499 and preceding 501.
  • * Ceawlin of Wessex becomes King of Wessex (traditional date). * ?thelbert succeeds his father Eormenric as king of Kent (traditional date). * Adda succeeds his brother Glappa as king of Bernicia (traditional date).
    * Aella becomes king of Deira (traditional date).
  • The 560s decade ran from January 1, 560, to December 31, 569.

area code 560

area code 560 – Garmin aera

Garmin aera 510 Color Touchscreen Aviation GPS (Americas)
Garmin aera 510 Color Touchscreen Aviation GPS (Americas)
Garmin’s aera series of GPS portables are the perfect fly/drive navigation solution. All four aera models come with preloaded automotive maps, a built-in terrain/obstacles aviation database, Garmin’s patented Panel Page, and more. So, you can transition smoothly from runways to roadways with the aera model that best matches your needs and budget.

Consider the aera 510
Stepping up from Garmin’s base model aera 500, the 510 version adds support for NEXRAD imaging and all the other great XM WX™ satellite weather capabilities?. Plus, you can use the XM Radio capability to enjoy 170+ channels of digital music, news and other programming through your headset or cabin audio system. (The GXM 40 smart antenna is included with your aera.) In addition to the XM satellite access, the aera 510 comes fully preloaded with detailed aerial mapping of terrain contours and structural features. So, you’ll have a wealth of information resources at your fingertips, to help you make better flying decisions. What’s more, the simplicity of a single integrated cabling solution for power, music and datalink weather antenna options makes for easy, clutter-free aera connectivity in the cockpit.

In the Air, It’s a “Mini-MFD”
Your aera 510 comes ready to fly, right out of the box. Its detailed chart-style shaded mapping and extensive terrain and aviation databases (including private airports and heliports) help you visualize your flight path in relation to nearby navaids, terrain, SUAs, obstructions, and so on. To help keep pilots aware of special airspace activity, over 683 parachute drop zones are detailed in the Americas navigation database. Terrain/obstacle detail is shown in standard 30 arc-second resolution on the aera 510 display. And, as in all the aera models, GPS updating is provided at a super-fast 5 Hz rate.

?Subscriptions are required for optional XM weather/audio entertainment packages (sold separately)

Featuring crisp 4.3-inch QVGA wide-format displays with touchscreen interface, Garmin’s aera series of GPS portables are the perfect fly/drive navigation solution. All four aera models come with preloaded automotive maps, a built-in terrain/obstacles aviation database, Garmin’s patented Panel Page, and more. So, you can transition smoothly from runways to roadways with the aera model that best matches your needs and budget.
Garmin aera 510
The perfect fly/drive navigation solution.
Garmin aera 510 NEXRAD
Adds support for NEXRAD imaging and all the other great XM WX satellite weather capabilities.
Garmin aera 510 IFR
IFR map mode shows high and low enroute airways.
Garmin aera 510 Terrain
Terrain page offers overhead and vertical profile views.
Garmin aera 510 Coverage
Preloaded with Americas navigation database. Click to enlarge coverage map.
Garmin aera 510 City Navigator
Preloaded City Navigator NT mapping makes street navigation easy.
The Garmin aera 510
Stepping up from Garmin’s base model aera 500, the 510 version adds support for NEXRAD imaging and all the other great XM WX satellite weather capabilities (subscriptions required). Plus, you can use the XM Radio capability to enjoy 170+ channels of digital music, news and other programming through your headset or cabin audio system. (The GXM 40 smart antenna is included with your aera.) In addition to the XM satellite access, the aera 510 comes fully preloaded with detailed aerial mapping of terrain contours and structural features. So, you’ll have a wealth of information resources at your fingertips, to help you make better flying decisions. What’s more, the simplicity of a single integrated cabling solution for power, music and datalink weather antenna options makes for easy, clutter-free aera connectivity in the cockpit.
In the Air, It’s a “Mini-MFD”
Your aera 510 comes ready to fly, right out of the box. Its detailed chart-style shaded mapping and extensive terrain and aviation databases (including private airports and heliports) help you visualize your flight path in relation to nearby navaids, terrain, SUAs, obstructions, and so on. To help keep pilots aware of special airspace activity, over 683 parachute drop zones are detailed in the Americas navigation database. Terrain/obstacle detail is shown in standard 30 arc-second resolution on the aera 510 display. And, as in all the aera models, GPS updating is provided at a super-fast 5 Hz rate. For added safety, a database-driven terrain advisory feature offers TAWS-like color coding and pop-up alerts when possible obstructions or ground proximity conflicts loom ahead.
Reach New Levels of Awareness
The aera 510′s graphical Terrain page offers both overhead and vertical profile views of the landscape beneath your wings. And an IFR map mode lets you display and navigate on high or low enroute airways–while using your touchscreen map cursor to reference MEAs (Minimum Enroute Altitudes) and distances between intersections. For traffic awareness, an optional power/data cable (sold separately) makes it easy to interface your aera with the Garmin GTX 330 Mode S transponder in your aircraft, thus enabling you to access and display TIS traffic alerts in busy terminal airspace. What’s more, you can also use the aera to load communications frequencies into your Garmin SL 40 Comm or SL 30 Nav/Comm transceiver.
Out of the Heavens, Onto the Highways
When you arrive at your destination runway, aera lets you hit the ground running–with full automotive GPS capability and preloaded City Navigator NT street mapping. Operating much like Garmin’s popular n?vi line of touchscreen auto navigators, your aera 510 offers voice-guided turn-by-turn directions with text-to-speech audio technology that calls out streets by name. In addition, there’s built-in Bluetooth support for wireless hands-free calling with your compatible mobile phone. And the aera’s built-in “points of interest” database offers helpful guidance to millions of motels, restaurants, gas stations, ATMs, and other local attractions. You can use the aera’s XM satellite capability to watch the weather or listen to XM Radio entertainment while driving. And to speed your transition from aircraft to automotive mode, a unique “smart mount” for the aera offers instant clip-and-go car navigation.
About the Jeppesen Database
The aera includes an internal Jeppesen database that provides location and facility information for thousands of airports, VORs, NDBs, and more. Updates to the Jeppesen database are available every 28 days online, and the database includes the following information:
Airport–identifier, facility name, city/state/country, latitude/longitude, field elevation, available fuel types, runway designations and layout, runway surface, runway length, runway width, runway lighting, communication frequencies, and published approaches.
Weather–frequencies associated with an airport (ASOS, ATIS, and AWOS).
VORs–identifier, facility name, city/state/country, location (latitude/longitude), frequency, service volume (high, low, terminal), and type (such as VOR-DME, TACAN, and VORTAC).
NDBs–identifier, facility name, city/state/country, location (latitude/longitude), and frequency.
Intersections–identifier, nearest VOR, radial and distance from nearest VOR, location (latitude/longitude), and region/country.
ARTCC–Air Route Traffic Control Centers.
Airspace–boundaries (Class B, Class C, Control Zones, SUAs, and MOAs), controlling agency, and vertical boundaries.
FSS–Flight Service Stations.
Americas Terrain Database
Enhance situational awareness with the Terrain Aviation Database. This digital database contains the elevation data which represents the topography of the earth. Using this information, your Garmin aviation GPS monitors your current position in relation to surrounding terrain to provide alerts–giving you additional time to make critical decisions regarding the flight path. Since Terrain data does not include man-made objects (towers, airports, VORs etc.), updates to Terrain data do not occur on a regular basis.
The download process for Terrain updates is simple and convenient. Simply plug in your aviation device, download and go.
About City Navigator NT
With nearly 6 million points of interest and road coverage for U.S., Canada and Mexico, plus Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands and the Bahamas, City Navigator North America NT gives you everything you need to travel North America. Powered by NAVTEQ, a world leader in premium-quality digital map data, City Navigator brings you the most detailed street maps available so you can navigate with exact, turn-by-turn directions to any address or intersection.
Provides nearly 6 million points of interest, including hotels, restaurants, parking, entertainment, fuel and shopping.
Includes new extended coverage for Mexico.
Includes highways, interstates, and business and residential roads in metropolitan and rural areas.
Includes turn restrictions, roundabout guidance, speed categories.
Gives turn-by-turn directions.
Includes postal code support for Canada.
Speaks street names (example: “Turn right on Main Street.”).
What’s in the Box
aera 510, Free Single Database Update, GXM 40 smart antenna, Yoke Mount with Power Cable, Battery Pack, Portable Friction Mount, USB Cable, AC Adapter, Vehicle Power Cable, Pilot’s Guide and Owner’s Manual

Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid)

Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid)
Indian air force pilots walk away from their IL-76 medium cargo jet after landing at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, Sept. 20. The Indian crew flew Airmen from the 15th Airlift Wing on a training mission to show the capabilities of their aircraft to their American counterparts.
The Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid) is a multi-purpose four-engined strategic airlifter designed by Ilyushin design bureau. It was first planned as a commercial freighter in 1967. Intended as a replacement for the Antonov An-12, the Il-76 was designed for delivering heavy machinery to remote, poorly-serviced areas of the USSR. Military versions of the Il-76 have seen widespread use in Europe, Asia and Africa, including use as an airborne refueling tanker or as a command center.
The Il-76 has seen extensive service as a commercial freighter for ramp-delivered cargo, especially for outsized or heavy items unable to be otherwise carried. It has been used as emergency response transport for civilian evacuations and to deliver humanitarian/disaster relief aid around the world, especially to undeveloped areas due to its ability to operate from unpaved runways. A water-carrying version of the plane has been effective in fire-fighting. There is also a model used for zero-G training.
Design and development
Il-76 of the Indian Air Force lands in Leh, Ladakh.
The aircraft was first conceived by Ilyushin in 1967 to meet a requirement for a freighter able to carry a payload of 40 tons (88,000 lb) over a range of 5,000 km (2,700 nmi; 3,100 mi) in less than six hours, able to operate from short and unprepared airstrips, and capable of coping with the worst weather conditions likely to be experienced in Siberia and the Soviet Union’s Arctic regions. It was intended as a replacement for the An-12. Another intended version was a double-decked 250-passenger airliner but that project was cancelled. The Il-76 first flew on March 25, 1971.
Production of Il-76s was placed in Tashkent Aviation Production Association in Tashkent, Uzbekistan (then a republic of the Soviet Union). Some 860 of the basic transport variants were made.[4] In the 1990s, modernized variants were developed (MF, TF), with a cargo compartment 20 m long by 3.4 m wide by 3.4 m tall, but were not produced in significant quantity due to financial problems of the major user, the Russian Air Force. The prototype of the longer variant Il-76MF, with greater capacity, first flew on 1 August 1995. The production ceased around 1997, and the factory has since deteriorated.
Some commercial aircraft were modernized to the Il-76TD-90VD version, starting from 2004, using new PS-90 engines to meet European noise limits. In 2005, China ordered[clarification needed] in Russia 34 new Il-76MDs and 4 Il-78 tankers, and the factory in Tashkent produced 16 incomplete airframes. In 2004, A PLAAF (People’s Liberation Army Air Force) Il-76 carried out flight mission in Afghanistan, later in 2011, PLAAF Il-76s were sent to Libya to evacuate Chinese citizens. The two missions were reported first steps of PLAAF developing long-range transportation capacity.
Production of the Il-476 at a new production line at the Aviatstar factory in Ulyanovsk, in Russia, in cooperation with the Tashkent works, is under consideration.[4] The construction of two prototype IL-476s has begun at the Ulyanovk facility.
Operational history
USAF and IAF airmen work inside the cockpit of an Indian Il-76.
First aircraft were delivered to the Soviet Air Force in June 1974.[1] Next it became the main Soviet strategic transport aircraft. From 1976 it was operated by the Aeroflot lines.
Between 1979 and 1991, the Soviet Air Force Il-76s made 14,700 flights into Afghanistan, transporting 786,200 servicemen, and 315,800 tons of freight. The Il-76 carried 89% of Soviet troops and 74% of the freight that was airlifted.[10] As Afghan rebels were unable to shoot down high-flying Il-76s, their tactics were to try and damage it at take-off or landing. Il-76s were often hit by shoulder-launched Stinger and Strela heat-seeking missiles and large-calibre machine-gun fire, but because the strong airframes were able to take substantial damage and still remain operational, the aircraft had a remarkably low attrition rate during the period of conflict. Building on that experience, the bulk of the Canadian Forces equipment into Afghanistan is flown in using civilian Il-76. In 2006, the Russian Air Force had about 200 Il-76s. Civilian users in Russia have 108.
The Il-76 is also in use as an airborne tanker, otherwise known as a refueller (Il-78, some 50 were made[4]), and a waterbomber. Its airframe was used as a base for the Beriev A-50 ‘Mainstay’ AWACS aircraft (some 25 were made[4]). Still more applications have been found in Antarctic support flights and simulated weightlessness training for cosmonauts.[13] Beriev and NPO Almaz also developed an airborne laser flying laboratory designated A-60, of which two were built, although little is known

Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid) cockpit

Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid) cockpit
Major Latimer Neal gets a briefing in the cockpit of an Indian IL-76 medium cargo aircraft during a training mission over the big island of Hawaii Sept. 20. The Indian Air Force is flying members of the 15th Airlift Wing to show their American counter parts what the aircraft capability is.
The Ilyushin Il-76 (NATO reporting name: Candid) is a multi-purpose four-engined strategic airlifter designed by Ilyushin design bureau. It was first planned as a commercial freighter in 1967. Intended as a replacement for the Antonov An-12, the Il-76 was designed for delivering heavy machinery to remote, poorly-serviced areas of the USSR. Military versions of the Il-76 have seen widespread use in Europe, Asia and Africa, including use as an airborne refueling tanker or as a command center.
The Il-76 has seen extensive service as a commercial freighter for ramp-delivered cargo, especially for outsized or heavy items unable to be otherwise carried. It has been used as emergency response transport for civilian evacuations and to deliver humanitarian/disaster relief aid around the world, especially to undeveloped areas due to its ability to operate from unpaved runways. A water-carrying version of the plane has been effective in fire-fighting. There is also a model used for zero-G training.
Design and development
Il-76 of the Indian Air Force lands in Leh, Ladakh.
The aircraft was first conceived by Ilyushin in 1967 to meet a requirement for a freighter able to carry a payload of 40 tons (88,000 lb) over a range of 5,000 km (2,700 nmi; 3,100 mi) in less than six hours, able to operate from short and unprepared airstrips, and capable of coping with the worst weather conditions likely to be experienced in Siberia and the Soviet Union’s Arctic regions. It was intended as a replacement for the An-12. Another intended version was a double-decked 250-passenger airliner but that project was cancelled. The Il-76 first flew on March 25, 1971.
Production of Il-76s was placed in Tashkent Aviation Production Association in Tashkent, Uzbekistan (then a republic of the Soviet Union). Some 860 of the basic transport variants were made.[4] In the 1990s, modernized variants were developed (MF, TF), with a cargo compartment 20 m long by 3.4 m wide by 3.4 m tall, but were not produced in significant quantity due to financial problems of the major user, the Russian Air Force. The prototype of the longer variant Il-76MF, with greater capacity, first flew on 1 August 1995. The production ceased around 1997, and the factory has since deteriorated.
Some commercial aircraft were modernized to the Il-76TD-90VD version, starting from 2004, using new PS-90 engines to meet European noise limits. In 2005, China ordered[clarification needed] in Russia 34 new Il-76MDs and 4 Il-78 tankers, and the factory in Tashkent produced 16 incomplete airframes. In 2004, A PLAAF (People’s Liberation Army Air Force) Il-76 carried out flight mission in Afghanistan, later in 2011, PLAAF Il-76s were sent to Libya to evacuate Chinese citizens. The two missions were reported first steps of PLAAF developing long-range transportation capacity.
Production of the Il-476 at a new production line at the Aviatstar factory in Ulyanovsk, in Russia, in cooperation with the Tashkent works, is under consideration.[4] The construction of two prototype IL-476s has begun at the Ulyanovk facility.
Operational history
USAF and IAF airmen work inside the cockpit of an Indian Il-76.
First aircraft were delivered to the Soviet Air Force in June 1974.[1] Next it became the main Soviet strategic transport aircraft. From 1976 it was operated by the Aeroflot lines.
Between 1979 and 1991, the Soviet Air Force Il-76s made 14,700 flights into Afghanistan, transporting 786,200 servicemen, and 315,800 tons of freight. The Il-76 carried 89% of Soviet troops and 74% of the freight that was airlifted.[10] As Afghan rebels were unable to shoot down high-flying Il-76s, their tactics were to try and damage it at take-off or landing. Il-76s were often hit by shoulder-launched Stinger and Strela heat-seeking missiles and large-calibre machine-gun fire, but because the strong airframes were able to take substantial damage and still remain operational, the aircraft had a remarkably low attrition rate during the period of conflict. Building on that experience, the bulk of the Canadian Forces equipment into Afghanistan is flown in using civilian Il-76. In 2006, the Russian Air Force had about 200 Il-76s. Civilian users in Russia have 108.
The Il-76 is also in use as an airborne tanker, otherwise known as a refueller (Il-78, some 50 were made[4]), and a waterbomber. Its airframe was used as a base for the Beriev A-50 ‘Mainstay’ AWACS aircraft (some 25 were made[4]). Still more applications have been found in Antarctic support flights and simulated weightlessness training for cosmonauts.[13] Beriev and NPO Almaz also developed an airborne laser flying laboratory designated A-60, of which two were built, although lit

area code 560

EVGA GeForce GTX 560 1024 MB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 2DVI/Mini-HDMI SLI Ready Graphics Card, 01G-P3-1460-KR
Looking for a next generation DirectX 11 card that has hard hitting graphics performance, but not hard hitting on your wallet? Look no further than the EVGA GeForce GTX 560. This card allows you to discover the incredibly detailed DirectX 11 worlds, with tessellation performance that destroys the competition. Get your PC ready to dominate this year’s blockbuster game titles like Duke Nukem Forever and Crysis 2! Performance is not the end of the story though; full DirectX 11 done right that blows away the competition, NVIDIA 3D Vision, NVIDIA Surround Gaming, NVIDIA PhysX and award winning EVGA support give you the edge on your opponents and peace of mind on your hardware. Get an immersive experience today with the EVGA GeForce GTX 560. Specifications include the GTX 560 (810 MHz core clock) chipset, 1024MB of GDDR5 memory with a 4008 MHz memory clock, 256 bit memory interface, 1620 MHz Shader Clock, 336 CUDA cores, 128 GB/sec Memory Bandwidth, 45.4 GT/s Texture Fill Rate and PCI Express 2.0 compatibility. Additional features include Microsoft DirectX 11 Support, NVIDIA PhysX and NVIDIA PureVideo HD Technologies, NVIDIA 2-way SLI readiness, NVIDIA 3D Vision Surround readiness, NVIDIA CUDA technology with CUDA C/C++, DirectCompute 5.0 and OpenCL support, PCI-Express 2.0 support and OpenGL 4.1 support. Connections are 1 Mini-HDMI 1.4a connector and 2 Dual-Link DVI-I HDCP capable connectors. Package includes the EVGA Driver/software disc with EVGA Precision Tuning utility, 1 DVI to VGA adapter, 2 6-pin PCI-E power cables and a 3 Year warranty if registered within 30 days at evga.com.

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